The Beat - A pulse on our findings and adventures — cotton

Designing by Warp

Posted by Emi Weir on

Designing by Warp
The Taileu ethnic groups are known for their exceptional weaving skills and passion for colour. We work with one group based in a rural town six hours north of Luang Prabang We have always loved their soft cotton, array of natural colours, so much so we had to work with them for our modern ombrė designs. 

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Tai Leu Textures : White Flower

Posted by Emi Weir on

Tai Leu Textures : White Flower

This texture is one of our all time favorites from the original Sabai Collection. Using a traditional pattern woven with the same color in the warp and the weft, we have designed a luxurious, well-balanced texture. Long wefts float across the face of the fabric to create a soft, rippling appearance while preserving the traditional pattern, the Tai Leu "Small Flower".      The Small Flower pattern is another common Tai Leu Design that we have altered to fit into the modern home. From a distance or at glance it may read as a texture, but when wrapped up in one of...

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The Tai Leu Chevron

Posted by Emi Weir on

The Tai Leu Chevron
Last fall a customer came to us requesting a basic chevron pattern. Initially, we were reluctant. How could we create something that would satisfy their request, but still stay true to the spirit of a Tai Leu Textile? 

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What makes TaiLeu cotton so good?

Posted by Emi Weir on

What makes TaiLeu cotton so good?
A love affair with Taileu cotton and how the people, culture and traditions shape their weaving to make it so good. Published in Garland Magazine Issue 6.

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Wearing a “sinh” or Lao skirt - a brief guide for foreigners

Posted by Emi Weir on

Wearing a “sinh” or Lao skirt - a brief guide for foreigners
No it is not a confession, a “sinh” is a Lao skirt.  When in Laos, a foreign woman who wears a sinh is showing respect, whether she wears it for ceremony, to work or just around out about. I suggest try it. It gives you kudos, partly because many assume you are working here or even better still, volunteering. 

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